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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 24, 2018 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and ben thompson. a plan to halve childhood obesity by 2030. energy drinks, junk food adverts and sweets at supermarket checkouts could be restricted under proposals being unveiled in england. good morning. it's sunday 24th june. world cup fever for england fans in russia. a win against panama today could mean an automatic place in the last 16. as england prepare, germany were on the brink of being knocked out at the group stage. but toni kroos saves the reigning champions in the final seconds against sweden. finally in the driving seat. women in saudi arabia celebrate as the ban on female drivers is lifted. and it looks set to be a sunny sunday for many of us. sarah keith—lucas has the weather.
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good morning. we are in for another dry and warm day today with more sunshine than yesterday and the temperatures will continue to build through the week ahead. i will bring you more in 15 minutes. thank you, sarah. we will see you later. good morning. first, our main story: a ban on the sale of energy drinks to children, tighter restrictions on junk food advertising on tv, those are just two of the government's proposals to halve childhood obesity in england by 2030. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, said the cost of obesity to individuals and the national health service is now too great to ignore. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes reports. the government's first obesity strategy for england, unveiled in 2016, was seen by many health campaigners as a missed opportunity. ever since, ministers have been under pressure to go further and so many of the measures that were ditched two years ago are now back on the agenda. the new obesity strategy includes a proposal to ban tv advertising ofjunk food before
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the 9pm watershed. there will also be curbs on supermarket promotion, such as buy—one—get—one—free deals on sugary, high—fat foods. and all primary school children in england will be encouraged to get active through schemes like walking or running a daily mile. we are delighted to see this new childhood obesity plan. it's brave and ambitious and it's where we should be as a nation. the scottish government also plans to announce tough measures to reduce obesity, an issue that is now firmly established as one of the big public health challenges facing the uk. but after what was widely seen as a false start, the government's plans will now face close scrutiny. dominic hughes, bbc news. something is happening today at the world cup. you think? at the world cup, england meets panama this afternoon. a win will take the team
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through to the next round of the competition in russia. despite injury, expectations are high, but panama will appreciate the balmy conditions in nizhny novgorod, where the game is being played. natalie pirks has been talking to the fans ahead of the match. it was once a bastion of soviet secrets, but now nizhny novgorod is revelling in its role as welcoming hosts. i think it's fair to say we came with a little bit of trepidation because you never know until you get here, but in general we've always found if you're nice to people, they are usually nice back. put your shirt on, people take photographs and shake hands and buy you a drink. it's the opposite, they love us. we thought it would be a war zone, but the locals have been really friendly, so so far, so good. a win against panama this afternoon would guarantee england a place in the last 16. in russia's 13th century city, gareth southgate is keen to consign past failures to history. we are a team who are hungry, we want to improve and show
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people an england team can play in a different way. we've got technically good players, we want them to get on the ball and express themselves and really attack the game as we did from the opening minutes of the game the other night. this panama side is organised, their style is, let's say, robust. england can expect a physical test in the heat of nizhny novgorod this afternoon. but, if they play the way they played against tunisia, they should continue to thrill fans back home. that's what everybody wants to see. it excites fans. people are happy back home to see a team play with such energy and a forwardthinking team. so, yeah, keep that going. this has already been a world cup of shocks. defeat today to panama would be right up there. natalie pirks, bbc news, nizhny novgorod. natalie talking about what will happen on the pitch. but what about nizhny novgorod? sarah raynsford is in the middle of the city. it is an
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interesting place. good morning. in the middle of the city. it is an interesting place. good morningm is. in fact, the fifth biggest city in russia, so not a small place by any means, but the centre is pretty compact. at the end you can see the main site, the kremlin, nizhny novgorod has its very own kremlin. the people who flooded into nizhny novgorod for this game and the other games taking place here have been touring around the sites, taking in the cultural spots as well as the bars and cafes. this is a city that has been transformed by this world cup, as russia as a whole has, but particularly nizhny novgorod perhaps. in soviet times, this place was completely closed to foreigners. it was the place they built tanks, atomic submarines, foreigners were just not welcome and they were prohibited. it is a long time since the soviet union collapsed but this was not a tourist destination. this has changed, and obviously with the world cup more people will come here. very hot in the summer and plenty of places for people to see,
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which they seem to be enjoying so far. indeed. thank you, sarah. women in saudi arabia are officially allowed to get behind the wheel of a car after the authorities lifted a ban on them driving. it was the last country in the world to impose the rule. the change was announced last year and the country issued the licences to women earlier this month. donna larson reports. just after midnight in riyadh, and a piece of history is about to be made. a perfectly normal act in every other country in the world but, until now, not in saudi arabia. ujdeen takes the wheel of the family car and drives into the street. all i can think about, i can still do my own stuff. i don't have to ask for anyone to take me around. that's very important.
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for us to drive... 0k, maybe a lot of us don't need to drive but, for me, i used to drive, i used to do my own stuff. so i'm not used to someone to drive me around. wow! i'm so excited, i'm so happy. honestly, i can't express my feelings. i haven't been sleeping for two days, just thinking about this moment. and today we're actually on the roads, driving. people are waving, they're so happy. i'm so honoured. it's an amazing feeling. enjoying the freedom of the city, this change has been a long time coming. some activists have been demanding the right to drive for decades. back in 2013, this woman took the wheel in defiance of the law. some were punished for doing the same thing. change is under way in saudi arabia. cinemas have been allowed to open along with the first music concerts and the first fashion week. it's all part of a modernisation drive led by the crown prince, mohammad bin salman. but while some restrictions are easing, saudi women are still not free to travel, marry, divorce, or even leave prison without the permission of a male relative. and those who demand too much change
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are still being punished. 0nly last month, more than a dozen prominent women's activists were arrested for demanding greater rights. donna larson, bbc news. a group of pro—brexit politicians and business figures have urged the prime minister to speed up preparations to leave the eu without a deal. former cabinet ministers are among those to have signed a letter saying the uk must show it is ready to walk away in order to have real leverage. tens of thousands of people marched in central london yesterday to demand a final vote on any exit deal. a 15—year—old boy has been stabbed to death following a party in east london. metropolitan police were called to a community centre in romford at around 9 o'clock last night. three teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder. there have been more than 70 murders in the capital so far this year. the growing tensions over the arrival of african and middle eastern migrants from across the mediterranean will be discussed by eu
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leaders in brussels today. it comes amid concerns about the use of charity vessels to rescue migrants off the coast of libya. more than 40,000 migrants have reached europe so far this year with a further 1000 thought to be missing or dead having attempted the crossing. one of britain's main railway lines is back under state control this morning. the east coast line was returned to public ownership after the government ended the stagecoach and virgin franchise. it will now be known as the london north eastern railway, a name last used in the 1940s. the department for transport will run the service until at least 2020. game of thrones stars kit harington and rose leslie have married at a ceremony in aberdeenshire. the couple, who played on—screen lovers jon snow and ygritte, first met on the programme in 2012. guests at the big day included fellow stars from the hit show peter dinklage and maisie williams. congratulations to them and anyone
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who got married this weekend of course. and we want to be saying congratulations to england today. if england win against panama today it will be the first time in 12 years that they will have won both opening matches of the tournament, and their manager, gareth southgate, says he is cautiously optimistic. good use of the word cautious because he is not going to perfect. —— curse it. despite injuries, midges and near misses, optimism seems to be the theme for the young squad this year, at least so far. come on, england! i hadn't seen those pictures of them swimming with inflatable unicorns! let's find out how the players are feeling this morning. we can talk to
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the former england captain and defender terry butcher who is in moscow. good morning. how are you feeling? very optimistic. you said if england win but it is when england win because they are going to win today! for me it is just about how many? can we beat belgium and have a right go, going into the belgian game full of confidence?” am very pleased you reprimanded me. when england win. what will the score be if you think it is going to bea score be if you think it is going to be a big one? if they score early on, ithink be a big one? if they score early on, i think they can go up to four pool five because panama will know their world cup is virtually over. they have one game after this but they can't reach england and they can't reach belgium. they will see drawing against england as a positive result and possibly a chance for qualifications they will play a very tight. tunisia had to come out yesterday against belgium and they got carved apart. it panama have the same game plan of coming out and attacking england, england have got the power and the pace to
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cut them open again. you have played at three world cups and you 77 appearances in an international career which ran from 1982 1990. times may have changed a little bit but how would you prepare the preparation that you put in as part of the national team compared to what you have been seeing with gareth southgate's team ? what you have been seeing with gareth southgate's team? we would have loved those unicorns, and so would gazza! he would probably have shot them with a bb gun! he was great for our entertainment but gareth southgate has kept everybody level—headed and their feet on the ground. the so—called team has been leaked, but gareth just took it in his stride. he is very calm and relaxed and assured, and i think he will be at perth england manager. hopefully he can take england through to the knockout stages, which is the ultimate dream. —— he will be a very good england manager.
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get to the quarterfinals, see what happens. it is a new england, a new feature for us. gareth will leave a very good legacy for future managers to come. we were talking to joleon lescott on the sofa a few minutes ago and he was talking about the use of england's team compared to panama's experience. —— the youth of england. i think the oldest player will be ashley young at left back at 32, and the average is 25 and one third years old, and they are learning all the time. before the game against tunisia england players had not won world cup match and now they have. you can't say they are world cup veterans but they will have been buoyed up by that and they will want to win another match and another and so on. it is a new experience and they are learning all the time and this team is really very much and the more the team plays together, the better it will
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become. young boys can be moulded, adapted, change, and they can fit to another system and another, and have the confidence to do just that. they are young and eager with plenty of la kes are young and eager with plenty of lakes which england will need in the tournament. i don't know if you are bored of this image. it is you wearing a bloodied head bandage. you are shaking your head! sorry. this is when you sustained an injury in a world cup qualifier in 1989 against sweden. you were tough, you were hardy. i want to ask you now, some of the sneaky and pathetic behaviour we have seen on the pitch from some of the teams, and when var has picked it up. what do you make of some of the players so far? there are no crunching tackles, which has been ruled out of the game completely. that is what i love to do, hurt people. but you can't do that now. but the worst thing now is players diving and it is ludicrous. awful. no player has been booked for
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simulation at the world cup yet but there should have been a stream of yellow cards. i would like to see fifa clamping down on that. they are worried about holding from corners but only one penalty has been given for that so far. what they say and what they do are two different things. they have got to clamp—down on typing because it is an integral pa rt on typing because it is an integral part of the game now, and even defenders dive, which i would never do. fifa have got to clamp—down on it. the one blight on the world cup is diving. with germany hopefully through, and i say hopefully because you want the best players in the latter stages to make it the best world cup ever. what did you make of the game between sweden and germany? i was heartbroken for sweden in the 95th minute. i don't know how you felt about it? there would have been a lot of cheering in germany and groaning in england with germany being on the ropes but credit to them for coming back. they are force and machine and toni kroos was the best player on the pitch by a mile and it was fitting that they got the
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winner. they started off like a house on fire but teams that do start well don't tend to win it. it isa start well don't tend to win it. it is a slow burner, a marathon not a sprint. germany will be at the end, no doubt, but they will probably have to play brazil in the 16, the way the groups are going. that'll be a shame but it is the way it goes. you want your best teams to go through and germany are one of the best. what will you be doing when you are watching the match and how will you be preparing and celebrating? if anybody saw me celebrating? if anybody saw me celebrating the victory against tunisia, they will know that it could get even louder and even worse. we will be banging things on the tables and things like that. the little studio at the back, we have a small radio studio, but it is packed and everybody wants england to do well. we will be cheering with lots of other hole and stand to celebrate. we are not anticipating things but we are looking forward to
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another england victory. —— lots of alcohol on standby to celebrate. another england victory. —— lots of alcohol on standby to celebratem has been a pleasure to talk to you. i like that the alcohol is on standby. do not pre—empt. world cup coverage is on bbc one and radio 5 live today. so how will the weather looks? we have got the queens final, tennis, and football later. sarah will be looking at the weather. it is probably too good to stay inside to watch it so dragged the television to the window. that is a great idea! get your television at the window and a sun lounge and alcohol on standby as well. it is a beautiful day out there if you are watching the football. this is the scene in eastbourne. some high cloud around, turning the sunshine hazy, but certainly not spoiling the day. a beautiful day out there and the week ahead looks the same. dry and sunny with temperatures warming up. we had a bit of rain in the northern
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isles, but it is clearing away now and high pressure is really in charge of the weather, notjust today but right through the coming week. after a fresh start to the morning, things are warming up in the sunshine. there is more of that high cloud drifting south across england and wales. some cloud lapping on the shore in eastern scotla nd lapping on the shore in eastern scotland and north west scotland seeing some cloud here and there. blue skies and lighter winds than in recent days, so that bit warmer. we are set to sea temperatures in the low to the mid 20s this afternoon but cooler towards the north of scotland. in the south—east it will feel very pleasant but cooler if you are heading to the coast. sea breezes developing. breezes coming in from the coast towards the east and cooler in east anglia, kent and sussex as well. 0vernight, dry and clear and temperatures dipping into single figures in the countryside. not too uncomfortable and humid for
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sleeping overnight. yellow colouring with us at the moment but the change in air mass, and warmer air spills in from the continent this week, with orange colouring heading our way through the western isles. 0therwise dry and settled. temperatures up to 29 in the sunshine. widely into the mid 20s wherever you are. tuesday will be similar. spot the difference this week. dry again with cloud drifting around and sunshine hazy at times. sea breezes starting to develop and temperatures into the high 20s on tuesday and then it gets even hotter. we could see 30 and even 31 in the middle of the week. not dissimilar to that conditions in nizhny novgorod today. 31 for the game with panama and england.
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sunshine, dry and similar conditions if you are watching it back home. nice pronunciation! nizhny novgorod. i hope i got it right. you did. we have been struggling all morning! and we were practising. some of the uk's sewage companies are regularly dumping untreated human waste into rivers. that's according to an investigation by bbc‘s countryfile. the programme found thousands of sewage outlets designed to operate only in the heaviest downpours are overflowing throughout the year. tom heap reports. when it comes to pollution, rivers are facing a threat from emergency storm drains that release excess sewage in times of extreme rainfall to stop it backing up on our streets and homes. they are legal but csos
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and homes. they are legal but csos and coastal areas like these have been campaigned against for years. now countryfile has discovered there are nearly 25,000 of these outlets across the uk dumping untreated waste into our rivers. they are only supposed to operate as a last resort. we discovered that some are operating throughout the year, dumping human sewage, which is a threat to our health, our environment and our wildlife. using requests under environmental information regulations, which water companies have got to answer, we discovered that in england and wales alone, there were some 70,000 recorded spills of untreated waste injusta recorded spills of untreated waste injust a year. recorded spills of untreated waste in just a year. tony recorded spills of untreated waste injust a year. tonyjuniperfrom the worldwide fund for nature says oui’ the worldwide fund for nature says our outdated sewage system has got to change. we need first of all to be investing in the infrastructure to improve sewage treatment facilities. we need to be issuing biggerfines for when illegal
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discharges do occur. we need to be doing more to create sustainable drainage around new housing estate and areas where we are creating lots of ha rd and areas where we are creating lots of hard services which are discharging large amounts rainfall very quickly into the combined sewage and drainage networks causing these overflows. in england the water have committed to a £400 million upgrade of the country's sewers. meanwhile in the north west, there are 2000 csos operated by united utilities. what is this company doing to relieve the pressure on the network that serves 3 million homes? this is a large open to her storm overflow detention tank. you are not kidding about the large! amazing. what we try and do here, we try and store as much storm water following a rainfall event as we possibly can, and then when the storm subsides we return it back to the network and we sent it for treatment. meanwhile the environment agency says that water companies are
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on course to have about 80% of csos monitored, but that will not be until 2025. bbc news. and you can see tom's full report on tonight's countryfile, that's at 7 o'clock here on bbc one. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. the entertainmentjournalist emma bullimore is here to tell us what's caught her eye. are you enjoying world cup fever?” am more of an entertainment journalist but you have got to try and get involved. what have you picked up today? 0besity. we are talking about the new proposals, quite interesting, clamping down on junk food advertisements by 2030. the government is in phase two of the obesity programme. they want to halve childhood obesity by 2030 and lots of things they are trying,
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which is arable. 0ne lots of things they are trying, which is arable. one of the big things we are talking about today is labelling. if you go to a takeaway, restau ra nt, labelling. if you go to a takeaway, restaurant, the number of calories will be on there. in some ways that is good but if you are going out for a treat do you need to hammer home how many calories i will be consuming? now they are saying that eating out is not really a treat any more and people are eating out but more and people are eating out but more often and it is not so special so we more often and it is not so special so we need to be aware of what we are consuming. there is also a big thing about energy drinks which is almost a no—brainer, right? thing about energy drinks which is almost a no-brainer, right? pure sugar sometimes. jamie oliver did a campaign about it which was very persuasive. they need to clamp down on them because i don't think children realise they are consuming pure caffeine and they could use calories in a better way. it is breaking habits as well, which is
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hard. exactly. breaking habits as well, which is ha rd. exactly. we breaking habits as well, which is hard. exactly. we still see people smoking with cigarette packages with very brutal images on them and people will still do that, you have got to look at the complex psychological reasons why people are comfort eating, having these kinds of foods. it is such a complex issue. the government has got to try lots of different things. speaking of energy, generations, which is the headline. the idea that students will be able to start the school day at ten o'clock instead of 830 m so that they get the lion and it is proving to work. —— 8:30am so that they get a lion. this isjust about adapting. i suggest your dayjust slides, and then you go to bed later and so it doesn't make any difference. kids are under pressure. people say that doesn't prepare you for the working world when you start at eight o'clock, whatever, but a lot of exams and a lot to deal with. there is a lot of research about when people are most productive and for some people that is later so it is good to experiment. and it is to do with age. actually younger people are not programmed to get up early.
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and they are still growing. they do need more sleep apparently. it says they are only getting seven and a half hours and i would love that! but teenagers need nine or ten. i don't really like getting out of bed now but at that age it was a real struggle. i think it is quite a good idea. we were talking to terry butcher earlier who says the alcohol is on standby ahead of the victory that england will experience, obviously! but what about millennial is and booze? the papers are possessed with alcohol today, whether there is enough beerfor the football and drop people at askaud. but this is saying it is a combination of millennial is drinking less and people being aware of the calories in booze and it being empty calories. we are drinking much less and we are seeking out low alcohol alternatives. low alcohol wine has gone up sales have gone up ten fold since 2009, they are saying. an
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interesting development. the carbon dioxide, a potential shortage of beer. there is a shortage of that. yes, a potential shortage because there is not enough c02 to go around to make the beer fizzy but also lots of other things. and sometimes if you are driving you don't want to co nsta ntly you are driving you don't want to constantly drink orange juice and you want to be like an adult, like pa rt you want to be like an adult, like part of something. the more low alcohol alternatives there are is great. and an interesting one in the mirror. we like it when brits do well in america because we have something to prove. james gordon set to agree a new £50 million deal for his show. he has really nailed it. lots of people will have seen carpool karaoke with paul mccartney and he has had some wonderful names on that. we can't seem to make the late—night
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on that. we can't seem to make the late— night chat show on that. we can't seem to make the late—night chat show format work. they have larger budgets and they can throw more money at it. it is going really well and it is nice to see that. headlines coming up and we will be back with you shortly. hello. this is breakfast with ben thompson and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main news. new proposals have been announced to try to halve childhood obesity in england by 2030. the government has published a set of measures which includes a ban on the sale of energy drinks to children, tighter restrictions on junk food advertising on tv and limits on supermarket promotions. this is what the government has told us. public health england is really pleased to see the depth and breadth of the second chapter of the child obesity plan. it builds on the success of the first chapter, the introduction
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of a levy on sugar, sweet and drinks, the structured reformulation programme and it includes things like the ambition to introduce a nine o'clock watershed on advertising healthy foods to our children during family viewing. —— unhealthy foods. saudi arabia has become the last country in the world to allow women to drive. the ban that was in place for decades was lifted last night after campaigning by human rights groups. the change was announced last september with the country issuing licences earlier this month. it's part of crown prince mohammed bin salman's programme to modernise some aspects of saudi society. a 15—year—old boy has been stabbed to death following a party in east london. metropolitan police were called to a community centre in romford at around nine o'clock last night. three teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder. there have been more than 70 murders in the capital so far this year. a group of pro—brexit politicians and business figures have urged the prime minister to speed up preparations to leave the eu without a deal. former cabinet ministers are among those to have signed
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a letter saying the uk must show it is ready to walk away in order to have "real leverage". tens of thousands of people marched in central london yesterday to demand a final vote on any exit deal. voting has begun in the presidential and parliamentary elections in turkey. president erdogan is hoping for another five—year term, during which he'd take on sweeping new powers. but he's facing a strong challenge in the presidential contest mainly from the centre—left, and in the parliamentary vote from a coalition of opposition parties. one of britain's main railway lines is back under state control this morning. the east coast line was returned to public ownership after the government ended the stagecoach and virgin franchise. it will now be known as the london north eastern railway, a name last used in the 1940s. the department for transport will run the service until at least 2020. new zealand's prime minister, jacinda ardern, and her partner, clark gayford, have been proudly showing
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off their new born baby girl, neve. ms ardern became the first woman in the country's history to give birth while in office. she is only the second world leader to give birth in office. she is regaining her strength thanks to macaroni cheese and has been swamped with messages of good wishes including a private emailfrom the queen. she'll spend a second night in auckland public hospital with her daughter, who has been dubbed the "prime miniature". we chose neve because we just liked it and when we met her we thought she looked like she suited the name. also it means in various forms bright and radiant and snow, which seemed like a good combination for matariki and for solstice. this story is right up my street. let's take you back to 1977. star wars.
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a new hope. han solo turns to a lightsaber—wielding luke skywalker and says: "hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster at your side, kid." do know what i am talking about? yes, i'm a big starwars fan. well someone took his advice and yesterday paid $415,000 for a blaster used by the actor, harrison ford in return of thejedi. the weapon was sold in a las vegas auction of sci—fi memorabilia owned by the art director who worked on the original star wars trilogy. made almost entirely of wood, the blaster was sold to the ripley's believe it or not chain of museums. it tops the previously best—selling star wars item, luke skywalker‘s lightsaber from the first two films, which sold forjust under £340,000. iam i am sorry. light sabre sold less than the blast as. it is a little
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bit later. if you're going to buy phil mera beasley, it is up with the cool stuff. —— film memorabilia. england are so going to win today's. expectations are on them. they did go out the group stage at the last world cup in brazil in 2014. this time they could qualify for the last 16 with a game to spare. we will be live in a minute. how close were germany to an early exit last night? i can tell you — 30 seconds from a draw with sweden that would have made it very difficult for them to get out of the group stages. the reigning champions have been knocked out in the group stages at the last two world cups and germany looked to be
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following suit when 0la toivonnen gave sweden the lead. marco reus then equalised early in the second half. but germany had a man sent off and they looked doomed until toni kroos stepped up in the 95th minute to keep them alive in russia. germany are now second in group f, mexico are top after they beat south korea 2—1. west ham's javier hernandez on the scoresheet in rostov. and england will have to win and score a bucketful of goals if they're to top group g tonight. that's because belgium beat tunisia 5—2 thanks to a couple of goals from a couple of premier league forwards. romelu lukaku and eden hazard both scoring twice in moscow. they play england on thursday. so, to england then. they play panama this afternoon and the equation is pretty simple. win, and they're through to the last 16 in russia. they've travelled the almost 600 miles from their training base in repino to nizhny novgorod, where we find our sports correspondent, natalie pirks. good morning, natalie.
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england playing in russia's newest stadium in what was once it's most secretive city? it is the most secretive city and the hottest city at the moment. actually not as hot as volgograd but the hottest we have been on our travels. 31 degrees and it will not cool down before england kick off at midday. 0nly cool down before england kick off at midday. only in the 90s, a quarter ofa midday. only in the 90s, a quarter of a century ago debate open their doors to foreigners. before that you could not come him because of its place in military production, producing tanks and the like. 0nly recently have they allowed foreigners in. they have been very kind to us, incredibly welcoming. there have been people all over the world walking down the streets with their flags,
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world walking down the streets with theirflags, very world walking down the streets with their flags, very cosmopolitan. let's have a look around the stadium. it is another new one they built for the world cup. they have all these glass panels that semi—reflective. at night it lights up. it looks nice at night—time. it is even hotter pitch side because there is a greenhouse effect. you can probably see from my shiny face it is hot. 0n the plus side, there are no midges. gareth southgate is enjoying himself was calm in his press c0 nfe re nce enjoying himself was calm in his press conference yesterday. the only real issue is the fact that dele alli is injured and it looks like ruby loftus—cheek, who came in at the end of the tunisia game, will start and pick up his sixth. there was also a ding—dong about whether marcus rasch would be in the team in place of raheem sterling but it looks like that raheem sterling will keep his place. the team seems to be
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ina very keep his place. the team seems to be in a very positive mood. history is not important for this team. they have an opportunity to create their own history. they should be excited. they are a young team that will get better and better. i really enjoy working with all of them and am intrigued to see how far they can go on how well they can play. we saw moments of that last night and we have to continue that and keep pushing and driving to be as good as we can be. panama are playing in their very first world cup. what can we expect? i went to panama and the term humble beginnings does not even cover it. baseball is the national sport, not football all—star the la st two sport, not football all—star the last two decades, they have not had a leader. —— a leak. last two decades, they have not had a leader. -- a leak. we are having a few problems with that microphone. you can watch all of the world cup
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matches today, including the england game at1pm on matches today, including the england game at 1pm on bbc one. there will also be commentary on bbc radio 5live. do you think they were rehearsing the music? they were indeed, for later. away from the world cup and the england rugby union coach eddiejones says his side are better for the series defeat against south africa. they finished with a flourish in the final test — winning 25—10 at newlands. jonny may with england's try thanks to brilliant work from danny cipriani, starting his first international test for a decade. we want to be the best team in the world, and you have to go through these periods to find out some things about yourself. we've done that, and now we want to kick on in november when it all starts again. we get another 400 caps back and we've got nine or ten club games to go through before we get the team together. here is one that will make you both
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laugh. so, england finally got the performance they were after in south africa, but the same cannot be said for the zulu impi dancers who have become part of the pre—match build up. it was rather wet at newlands, and they struggled to stay on their feet as they ran out ahead of the teams — perhaps a taste of the good, old british weather was what helped england feel at home. ireland meanwhile wrapped up a historic series win against australia — their first in almost 40 years. their only try of the match coming from cj stander. the rest of the damage coming from the trusty boot ofjohnny sexton to give them a 20 points to 16 win. it means they take the series 2—1. and scotland ended their summer tour with an emphatic win over argentina. peter horne scored two of their six tries in the 44 points to 15 win. in rugby league, england came from behind to ease
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past new zealand in a test match that was played in the us city of denver. it was england's first match since losing the world cup final last year and they looked in great form — debutantjake connor with one of the tries. 36—18 the final score. it was a busy day for england's women cricketers. they played two twenty20 games yesterday, beaten by south africa in the first and then bouncing back to defeat new zealand. england now lead the tri—series group with four points, with one round of games left to play on thursday. the men are back in action later this morning as they take on australia in their final one—day game at old trafford. all eyes on a big game this afternoon. where we are going to win. we have been told. when we spoke to 80—year
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old paul alexander this time last week, he described the journey he was about to undertake as "a celebration of his life". that's because when he was just one, his mother put him in the arms of a stranger in war torn germany and sent him to britain. it was a decision which probably saved him from the nazis. all this week he's been retracing the journey of the kindertransport rescue — by bike. he arrived back in london on friday and hejoins us now. let's speak to him. very good morning to you. just talk this through how it feels. we spoke to you this time last week. you have spent the week making the journey and you are now back in london. how has it been? it was an enormous challenge from an enormous physical undertaking to ride 600 miles at my age. i was determined to do it. i am happy and delighted i did it. exhausted now but i am glad i did it. it was a very emotionaljourney
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for me. you said your age. a lot of people will not believe in a million yea rs people will not believe in a million years that you are 18 years old. we are talking about something that happens when you were one and you have been retracing it. what do you know of the originaljourney?” have been retracing it. what do you know of the originaljourney? i will give you a little bit of background. iam80 give you a little bit of background. i am 80 was born in november, 1937. i was one years old. my mother had already lost two children in birth. i was her only child in november 1938 -- 1937 i was her only child in november 1938 "1937 when i i was her only child in november 1938 —— 1937 when i was born. a year after an event happens where awful things happened in germany. that was the triggerfor the things happened in germany. that was the trigger for the jewish organisations in england to organise an enormous rescue mission of children from germany, austria and czechoslovakia and they organised the kinder transport. my mother sent
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out... the world jewish relief organisation centre missionaries to these countries to locate children. those given priority work children whose parents were in concentration camps. my father was sent there. my mother heard about the opportunity to send me away. she had to make a decision between life and death. 0n the 14th ofjuly, 1939, and she made the 14th ofjuly, 1939, and she made the heart wrenching decision to put me on the train, together with other children on the kinder transport to england. she did that. she put me on the train not knowing whether she would ever see me again. i'd took off on the train and was only one year 7 months old and arrived safely in england. just to say, without
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being on the kinder transport, it is very possible you would not have survived. it is impossible to know. it is more true to say i would not have survived. almost all the dues who were left in germany were in fa ct who were left in germany were in fact annihilated. as i said, it was a decision between life and death. had i not got on the train i almost certainly would not have survived. you describe the journey is a celebration of your life. what is so wonderful about this journey is it has been with your family but also a number of relatives who were brought over at the same time as yourself. that is correct. second and third generation children of kinder on the journey. some of them were riding in celebration of the parents of their spouses, who were in fact kinder on
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the transports. it was a group of... everybody had some connection to the kinder transport operation. everybody had some connection to the kinder transport operationm everybody had some connection to the kinder transport operation. it is really wonderful to speak to you again. congratulations on that journey. you have earned a well earned rest. thank you forjoining us earned rest. thank you forjoining us today. thank you. you are welcome. i enjoy being here today. what a great story! very impressive. we are saying goodbye to you now. shall we say one last hello to sarah? the weather is going to be really nice. the sun has got its hat on out there for many of us. it is going to be another glorious day. it is staying dry pretty much across the board. this is a scene in eastbourne. through the week ahead we keep the
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dry and sunny weather and the temperatures really are going to be hotting up as well, certainly over the next few days. high pressure is driving the settled weather across the uk. whether friends driving the settled weather across the uk. whetherfriends are driving the settled weather across the uk. whether friends are clearing away to the north. it was a fresh start to the morning but has been warming up very nicely in the sunshine. —— whether friends. warming up very nicely in the sunshine. —— whetherfriends. a bit ofa sunshine. —— whetherfriends. a bit of a breeze funnelling down through the english channel as well. cloud in the far north—west of scotland as well. elsewhere, some fair weather crowd around. staying dry and sunny and warm than recent days. —— cloud around. widely in the low to mid 20s wherever you are. dry, around. widely in the low to mid 20s whereveryou are. dry, it around. widely in the low to mid 20s wherever you are. dry, it clear this evening with late sunshine and another dry night to come as well.
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temperatures will fall reasonably low. we are looking at single figures in the countryside first thing monday morning. if we look at the mls, we have yellow colours. later on this week you will notice the colours turning increasingly orange as a warmer air mouse starts to move in from the continent. temperatures on the rise through the day on monday. —— air mass. light winds for most of us and staying dry once again. by the time you get to monday, temperatures are above average for the time of year. just a touch clearer in the far north. cooler around the coast as we see the sea breeze is developing. similaron the sea breeze is developing. similar on tuesday with dry and light winds and a bit breeze around the coast. temperatures up to around 27, possibly 28 in the warmest spots. cooler around the east coast.
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those temperatures continue to rise, particularly in the middle of the week. similar conditions as england ta ke week. similar conditions as england take on panama today with temperatures up to 31 or 32 celsius. thank you so much. to enjoy the sunshine. —— do enjoy. some england fans have been cheering on the team at the world cup by wearing the replica kit, others have flags flapping on their cars. a street in greater manchester has gone one step further. supporters living on wales street in 0ldham have come up with a novel solution to prove their support for the three lions despite what their address suggests. ian haslam is there for us this morning. it is not wales street anymore, is it? no it is called england street now. when i came down here a couple of hours ago it quite literally took my breath away. fantastic. well overall 1000 england flags on the
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street. the neighbours have finally woken up. three lions is on and eve ryo ne woken up. three lions is on and everyone is happy. risk is very happy. he is on the beer already. —— chris. why did this all happen? we are unpatriotic bunch and we love england football. why not? it is never too early, is it? some would say it is. how much effort has gone into this? it costs a couple of hundred quid and everyone has mucked in. tell us about the cost of it. it is not cheap, is it? everyone chips ina is not cheap, is it? everyone chips in a fiver. 0ur welsh neighbour refuses. the school prediction today? easily 2—0, 3—0. —— the score
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prediction. that would be so typical of me to put that through a window but i did not, thank goodness. nelly has been attracted to my orange microphone. she has an england cap on and on england top. what is the thinking? she is the wales street mascot. what is the prediction? 2-0 to england. this dog is draped in a flag. he is called ralph and he is from wales. he predicts 3-1. i feel a doctor doolittle vibe going on here. tell us about the sense of community. we are all friends. on occasions like this we get together and do our bit. come out and put the flags up and get into the spirit.
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will it together? not necessarily. as we get further into the competition, for the final, we will all be watching it together. we have all be watching it together. we have all experienced heartbreak as england fans you look happy and have brilliant things on your head. how confident are you? we are having it this year. i am telling you it is an omen, we are winning this year. you are going for rashford. let's hope england can do it. confidence is sublime. don't you hate it when that happens. i think the excitement ove rca m e happens. i think the excitement overcame them in 0ldham. they are back. ian, give us a wave. lovely. that is england street, formerly known as wales street. it has
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changed just for today. let's hope they have a good afternoon and are celebrating later on. over the last week, events have been taking place to mark british flowers week, now in its sixth year. the occasion sees exhibitions, workshops and tours take place nationwide, promoting the work of growers and florists. in a moment we'll speak to the photographer, tessa bunney, whose images have been on show this week, but first let's take a look at some of her work. tessa's project is on display at ryedale folk museum in north yorkshire untiljuly the 15th. she is here to talk to me about it. i think you are my favourite guest because perhaps brought me flowers. this is your favourite flower and it is called a... scabious. why is it your favourite? i like is called a... scabious. why is it yourfavourite? i like colour and shape. there are lots of different types but that is my favourite one. talk to me about british flower week. why is it important?m
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talk to me about british flower week. why is it important? it was set up six years ago by the new covent garden market. i think it is to draw attention to the wide right to draw attention to the wide right to british flowers that are grown the uk. -- to british flowers that are grown the uk. —— wide variety. in recent yea rs the uk. —— wide variety. in recent years a the uk. —— wide variety. in recent yea rs a lot the uk. —— wide variety. in recent years a lot of flowers have been imported and now there is a resurgence in a growing with smaller growers who grow like, instead of ten varieties, they might grow 250 varieties. british flowers week is to celebrate that. how do people know if flowers are indigenous or grown at home when they are buying flowers a nd grown at home when they are buying flowers and plants? the organisation i have been working with have been campaigning for flowers to be labelled like fruit and veg so people do know. in some supermarkets there is more labelling than there used to be that it is still quite difficult for people to know. florists will know so you have to
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ask maybe. speak to me about the project you have been working on.” started in north yorkshire where i am from and now it is national. it is about documenting what goes on in growing flowers. i've photographed a number of farmers at work all through the seasons, good, bad, wet, muddy. notjust a pretty bit and the floating around cutting flowers but all aspects of it. it is something thatis all aspects of it. it is something that is very important to you. what made you take on the project?” that is very important to you. what made you take on the project? i have been living in asia for four years and was looking for a project when i came back. i read about one of my local farmers that sells their farm at the market, while i was still in asia. i looked up the link to flowers from the farm and read about
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the surgeons in flower growing and i did not know anyone else who was doing something about that. and i am growing things myself. it was a perfect fit. this was a self-funded a rts perfect fit. this was a self-funded arts project. how difficult is it to get something like this off the ground? it is not that difficult to do it. the people i am working with our fantastic. everyone has do it. the people i am working with ourfantastic. everyone has agreed to be photographed. there has been no kind of, i don't want to do it, or anything like that. i can work locally around my freelance jobs and other work. i do it when i scan. locally around my freelance jobs and other work. i do it when i scanm has been delightful talking to you. thank you for the flowers. good luck. there is a little something happening this afternoon. at one p:m., if you are not out and about, sarah has been telling us how lovely warm it be, england is playing. we
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obviously wish the team the best of luck and will have the results you tomorrow. you can see coverage on bbc one and there will be commentary and coverage on bbc radio live five. goodbye. have a lovely day. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 9am: a blueprint to halve childhood obesity by 2030. of sweets at supermarket checkouts could be restricted under new plans for england. we know that this is what people want. research shows us that parents really wa nt want. research shows us that parents really want to see all the things that are driving them to buy more and eat more cutbacks on. polls open in turkey's presidential and parliamentary elections , the biggest challenge to president erdogan's 15 years in government. women in saudi arabia finally get behind the wheel after an end to the ban on them driving. today we are actually on the road driving. people are waving. they are
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so happy. i
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